Tag Archive: Facebook

‘Chinese firms have become significant investors in American Tech start-ups’-What’s the deal?

The title of this post is from a New York Times article about why Chinese companies are actively investing American start-ups specializing in artificial intelligence and robots in order to advance both China’s military capacity as and its economy. Though these deals may be good for some investors, there are numerous questions and uncertainties which arise in terms of partnerships, intellectual property, and regulations on foreign takeovers. Read on

Who are the Tech VCs gladly funding? –It’s  Biotech!

According to an article by CNBC, Start-ups at the intersection of biology and tech are so hot in demand right now, so much that are receiving different valuations and checks.- “Tech investors will offer higher valuations if they believe you’re going to grow like a tech company…” Read on

Violent Crimes on Social Media-Tech companies quick to spot video violence

Who would have thought that social networks would no longer be just simply about ‘socializing among friends and business people’? Those days are gone! In a blog post on LSE US Center- “How social media is changing the way people commit crimes and police fight them”, Ray Surette, a Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice at the University of Central Florida, writes that social media has consequently led to a new type of ‘performance crimes’, where perpetrators can break the law via  texts, images and video, and at the same time draw attention from the large public. The good news is that, social media is also making it easier for law enforcement officials to combat such crimes happening on these platforms. (Read on)  In another article by CNBC, Tech companies from Singapore to Finland are focusing on improving  artificial intelligence in order to automatically spot and block crime videos before they go viral on social media. Read on 

High time we said ‘Tschüs und Ade’ to Fake accounts and false news spreading on Facebook?

Yes please! It’s about time someone did something about that!

Facebook recently published a paper “Information Operations and Facebook”- where the company highlights their efforts to add new technologies to spot fake accounts and to detect  false amplifiers and other forms of abuse on their platform. In the paper, Facebook explains how the company intends to expand their security focus from ’traditional abusive behavior, such as account hacking, malware, spam and financial scams, to include more subtle and insidious forms of misuse, including attempts to manipulate civic discourse and deceive people.’- Here’s what they’re doing about ‘False News’ and ‘Targeted Data Collection’ Read on here and here

Suceeding At Your Job, Facebook vs LinkedIn, Midlife Career Change

 

When just being good at your job isn’t good enough!- “To keep succeeding in your career, you must add value to your organization through continuous learning” (more at Strategy+Business). Also, here is how a ‘Craftsman-Like Approach’ helps to achieve greater joy at work (Forbes)

Okey! This one is a little tough- Is LinkedIn the new Facebook? Or Is Facebook the new LinkedIn? Either way, the game is changing. LinkedIn has completely transformed with some added functionality some of which include “Facebook-style” timeline. Facebook on the other hand, is now helping lower-skilled worker, freelancers, and those individuals who aren’t actively looking for a job.(see The Next Web)

Well, the big question is how would jobs seekers, employers and companies benefit from all of this?  Here’s how Facebook is helping small businesses having trouble hiring (Techcrunch)  Also, here is how to make  LinkedIn work for you (Converge) And finally, when you want LinkedIn  to retain its professional integrity, and avoid getting into a noisy conversation (Business2Community)

Midlife career changes happens more often than we can imagine. But with good planning, making a big career move in your late 30s or older is possible and can be quite rewarding. Here is what you need to do to  successfully make a midlife career change- (Entrepreneur) Also,  NPR shares a few posts highlighting reasons why people consider midlife career shifts (npr.org). At some point, radical change is required. Depending on your goals, if you choose a a completely new career direction you might require a re-training to improve or acquire new skills.(More at Stuff)

Yes, you can still  change jobs when you are near retirement. But there is need to understand the pros and cons, of voluntarily changing jobs on a retirement timing. Here is how -(Market Watch)  Also, understand how a midlif e career change can have a tremendous effect on retirement planning (Globe and Mail)

The filter bubble isn’t just Facebook’s fault – it’s yours

Following the shock results of Brexit and the Trump victory, a lot of attention has focused on the role that Facebook might have played in creating online political ghettos in which false news can easily spread. Facebook now has serious political influence thanks to its development from a social networking tool into a primary source of news and opinions. And for many, the way it manages this influence is in need of greater scrutiny. But to put the blame solely on the company is to overlook how people use the site, and how they themselves create a filter bubble effect through their actions.

Much of this debate has focused on the design of Facebook itself. The site’s personalisation algorithm, which is programmed to create a positive user experience, feeds people what they want. This creates what the CEO of viral content site Upworthy, Eli Pariser, calls “filter bubbles”, which supposedly shield users from views they disagree with. People are increasingly turning to Facebook for their news – 44 % of US adults now report getting news from the site – and fake news is not editorially weeded out. This means that misinformation can spread easily and quickly, hampering the chance people have for making informed decisions.

Over the last few weeks, there have been frequent calls for Facebook to address this issue. President Obama himself has weighed in on the issue, warning of the perils that rampant misinformation can have for the democratic process.

Much of the debate around this, however, has had an element of technological determinism to it, suggesting that users of Facebook are at the mercy of the algorithm. In fact, our research shows that the actions of users themselves are still a very important element in the way that Facebook gets used.

Our research has been looking specifically at how people’s actions create the context of the space in which they communicate. Just as important as the algorithm is how people use the site and shape it around their own communications. We’ve found that most users have an overwhelming view that Facebook is not ideally suited to political debate, and that posts and interactions should be kept trivial and light-hearted.

facebook-292989_1920

This isn’t to say that people don’t express political opinions on Facebook. But for many people there’s a reluctance to engage in discussion, and a sense that anything that might be contentious is better handled by face-to-face conversation. People report that they fear the online context will lead to misunderstandings because of the way that written communication lacks some of the non-linguistic cues of spoken communication, such as tone of voice and facial gestures.

There’s strong evidence in our research that people are actually exposed to a great deal of diversity through Facebook. This is because their network includes people from all parts of their life, a finding that echoes other research. In this respect, the algorithm doesn’t have a marked influence on the creation of filter bubbles. But because they often want to avoid conflict, people report ignoring or blocking posts, or even unfriending people, when confronted with views with which they strongly disagree.

They also report taking care of what they say themselves so as not to antagonise people such as family members or work colleagues whose views differ from theirs, but whose friendship they wish to maintain. And finally, they talk of making a particular effort to put forward a positive persona on social media, which again stops them from engaging in debate which might lead to argument.

Not so easy to fix

The idea that algorithms are responsible for filter bubbles suggests it should be easy to fix (by getting rid of the algorithms), which makes it an appealing explanation. But this perspective ignores the part played by users themselves, who effectively create their own filter bubbles by withdrawing from political discussions and hiding opinions they disagree with.

This isn’t done with the intention of sifting out diversity but is instead due to a complex mix of factors. These include the perceived purpose of Facebook, how users want to present themselves in an effectively public form, and how responsible they feel for the diverse ties that make up their online network.

The fact that manipulation by the algorithm isn’t the only issue here means that other solutions, for example raising people’s awareness of the possible consequences that their online actions have, can help encourage debate. We have to recognise that the impact of technology comes not just from the innovations themselves but also from how we use them, and that solutions have to come from us as well.

The Conversation

Philip Seargeant, Senior Lecturer in Applied Linguistics, The Open University and Caroline Tagg, Lecturer in Applied Linguistics and English Language, The Open University

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.